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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Q.  When is the TTCHS shelter open?

A.  Please visit our Locations & Hours page for a complete listing.

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Q.  How do I get to the TTCHS shelter?

A.  We are located at 180 Big Star Drive just east of the intersection of US Hwy 19 and Ga Hwy 122, sandwiched between the water tower and Tractor Supply.

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Q.  What does it cost to adopt an animal from the TTCHS?

A.  Thank you for considering adoption of an animal from our shelter!  The process, adoption fee, and what it allows us to provide with each pet is explained in detail on our Adoption Information page.

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Q.  If I adopt an animal will it be spayed/neutered?

A.  Yes!  Georgia law requires that all cats and dogs adopted from public and private shelters, rescue groups, and animal control agencies be sterilized before custody can be relinquished.  Alternatively the adopter can enter into a written agreement guaranteeing that sterilization will be performed by a licensed veterinarian within 30 days of acquisition or within 30 days of sexual maturity (i.e. 6 months of age) in the case of an immature animal.  TTCHS reserves this option only for those adopting puppies or kittens less than 6 months old.  Failure to comply is a misdemeanor subject to a fine of up to $200.

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Q.  What should I do if my pet is lost?

A.  Act quickly by searching your neighborhood, or the area where they were last seen, thoroughly.  Come to the shelter to view the stray animals and submit a lost dog or cat report.  Contact local veterinary practices.  And if your pet has a microchip, call the microchip company to notify them that he is missing and to verify that your contact information is up-to-date.  Read more helpful tips on our Lost & Found page.

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Q.  What should I do if I find a stray pet?

A.  Look for identification.  Rabies and microchip I.D. tags have numbers that can usually lead to the owner’s contact information by calling the issuing veterinarian, microchip manufacturer, or the TTCHS.  Bringing the stray pet to the shelter or a local veterinary practice will allow professionals to scan it for a microchip, tattoo, or other identifying features.  We can also compare it to the lost dog or cat reports currently on file and take a photograph in case her people visit the shelter to look for her.

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Q.  What should I do if I find injured wildlife?

A.  Be careful!  Wild animals are not pets and can act aggressively to defend themselves if injured.  Call 229-228-0613 and ask for our Animal Control Division.  Once the situation has been assessed we may call the Georgia Department of Natural Resources or provide safe transportation of the injured wildlife to the Androcles Society for medical care and rehabilitation.

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Q.  Does the TTCHS investigate suspected animal cruelty and neglect?

A.  You bet!  Using the enforcement arm of our organization, we investigate alleged cruelty, abuse, and abandonment cases and assist in their prosecution through the city, county, and state courts.  By contract with Thomas County and the cities therein (i.e. Thomasville, Boston, Pavo, Coolidge, Meigs, Barwick, and Ochlocknee) we have provided humane enforcement of all federal, state, and local laws pertaining to animals since 1993.  Please visit our Animal Control Division page for more information.

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Q.  How do I admit an animal to the TTCHS shelter?

A.  Please review the information on our Animal Admission page for some of the options you might consider before surrendering your pet to the TTCHS.  Because we run an open-admission shelter and contract with local government to provide animal control services, we accept every cat and dog brought to us that was either found running-at-large in Thomas County or is being surrendered by a resident of the same.

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Q.  How long are animals kept at the TTCHS?

A.  TTCHS does not set an expiration date on the animals in our care.  There is no predetermined limit for how long an animal can remain on the adoption floor.  Instead, we try to keep animals available for adoption for as long as we can if they stay healthy, happy, and do not become a danger to the public.  As an open-admission shelter TTCHS accepts every cat and dog that arrives at the shelter.  On average about 19 animals are admitted each day - about 5,000 in a year.  If we house too many animals at once, it’s unhealthy; overcrowding would lead to the spread of disease and would cause additional stress to the animals.  We work hard to euthanize as few animals as we can, and we treat all animals in our care as individuals.  TTHCS encourages all pet owners to spay and neuter their pets to help stem the tide of pet overpopulation.

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Q.  How do I volunteer with the TTCHS?

A.  The level of success we can achieve at the TTCHS saving animal lives and giving them a second chance can be greatly influenced by the help of our volunteers.  Volunteering can be hard work, but it is also fun and rewarding.  It’s a great way to help the lost, homeless, abused, and abandoned pets in our community.  Just a few hours each week can make a big difference.  Please read more in the Get Involved section of our site.

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Q.  Does the TTCHS offer group tours of its shelter?

A.  Yes!  We offer guided group tours by appointment only.  For reservations please call, visit, or email.  You will be contacted to verify the date and time before your tour.

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Q.  My animal is sick or in need of vaccinations; can I bring it to you for treatment?

A.  We are not able to give vaccinations to other people’s animals.  Nor can we perform spays/neuters.  To do so would be considered practicing veterinary medicine, and we do not have a veterinarian on staff.  If you’re new to the area we can recommend several good local veterinary practices.  They perform all of our spay/neuters and administer rabies vaccinations to all pets leaving the shelter.

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Q.  Which veterinarian(s) do you recommend?

A.  We have many local Veterinary Partners and are extremely grateful for their support of our organization.  Each of these clinics frequently provides medical services to our shelter animals at low or no cost.  This allows us to save more animals and some that might not otherwise get a chance at a loving forever home.

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Q.  Are you affiliated with the national animal welfare groups like HSUS or ASPCA?

A.  As a 501(c)(3) non-profit animal welfare organization we rely heavily on financial support received locally to ensure our future and allow us to continue caring for the 5,000 animals per year that come through our doors.  Like all humane societies and SPCAs we are independent and are not affiliated with, nor do we receive regular funding from, any national animal welfare organizations or advocacy groups.  We mean it when we say; your interest in the welfare of the lost, homeless, abused, and abandoned pets in our community is greatly appreciated and vital to our continued success!

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Q.  How do I donate to the TTCHS?

A.  The Thomasville-Thomas County Humane Society, Inc. (TTCHS) is the largest non-profit animal welfare organization in our area, and perhaps in southwest Georgia.  We were founded and incorporated in 1970 by a group of local animal welfare advocates with the goal of providing more humane treatment for the lost, homeless, abused, and abandoned animals of our community.  TTCHS received its exemption from federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code in January 1978 and maintains registration as a Charitable Organization in Georgia through the Secretary of State, Professional Licensing Boards and Securities Division.  Please visit the Donate section of our site to learn more.

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